u t o p i a



nosupervision:

Trust two people, tops. The truth is somewhere?
Hello, are you a UFO?

nosupervision:

Trust two people, tops. The truth is somewhere?

Hello, are you a UFO?

(Source: velozity)

theories-of:

Reid Ramirez
Boomin’ Words from Hell
2012
1989 Pontiac Sunbird car door, spray paint, organic navel orange, and bolts
37” x 21” x 25”
(Keith J. Varadi’s Image Resolution #19)

theories-of:

Reid Ramirez

Boomin’ Words from Hell
2012
1989 Pontiac Sunbird car door, spray paint, organic navel orange, and bolts

37” x 21” x 25”

(Keith J. Varadi’s Image Resolution #19)

list of electronic music genres, in order of most to least environmentally friendly

jobhaver:

  1. witch house, moon powered
  2. vaporwave, steam powered
  3. space rock, solar powered
  4. ambient, wind powered
  5. psychedelic trance, mind powered
  6. drum and bass, are the bass farm raised or wild caught?
  7. acid house, too many chemicals
  8. industrial, very heavy carbon footprint

ethel-baraona:

Looking forward to read this book!

networkedpolitics:

Video for our book Drone 

Fantasies of innovation. Soon enough, an increasing number of drones will populate the skies, progressively becoming inconspicuous in our daily lives. An undeniable source of public debate nowadays, unmanned aerial vehicles might be taken for granted in the future as their use becomes streamlined into devices for homeland security and consumer entertainment. Or an added low humming sound to modern megacities’ soundscapes. A flock of drones. Birds as an ongoing metaphor for these ever-so-present flying cyborgs. Whilst birds fade in and out, cut-outs from passages of the book are read and shuffled alongside found archival footage, as an invitation to peer into our past as contemporary subjects. If only we knew. Years beyond the 2012 Federal Aviation Association’s Modernization and Reform Act, we question how we might be perceiving our present in the future.

Video directed by Sarah Riazati with music by Jhon William Castaño Montoya

le-trou:

Un homme qui dort (1974)

le-trou:

Un homme qui dort (1974)


UN COUP DE DÉS JAMAIS N’ABOLIRA LE HASARD, 1969
Marcel Broodthaers

UN COUP DE DÉS JAMAIS N’ABOLIRA LE HASARD, 1969

Marcel Broodthaers

(Source: howcouldiknow)

justement:

Ian Stell

justement:

Ian Stell

(Source: gay--ghosts)

peckinpah:

Stars of the Lid — “Even If You’re Never Awake (Deuxième)”
From their double album And Their Refinement of the Decline.

This is one of those pieces where the timbre and sonority provide an emotional resonance much better than anything that can be written down with words.

Especially when the heavily treated strings kick in around 3:48.

(725 plays)
vuls:

Ian Hamilton Finlay, Sea / Land Sundial 1970

vuls:

Ian Hamilton Finlay, Sea / Land Sundial 1970


Octavio Paz y Jorge Luis Borges, México 1981

Octavio Paz y Jorge Luis Borges, México 1981

(Source: cazadordementes)

The effect of the cultural bomb is to annihilate a people’s belief in their names, in their languages, in their environment, in their heritage of struggle, in their unity, in their capacities and ultimately in themselves. It makes them see their past as one wasteland of non-achievement and it makes them want to distance themselves from that wasteland. It makes them want to identify with that which is furthest removed from themselves; for instance, with other peoples’ languages rather than their own. It makes them identify with that which is decadent and reactionary, all those forces that would stop their own springs of life. It even plants serious doubts about the moral righteousness of struggle. Possibilities of triumph or victory are seen as remote, ridiculous dreams. The intended results are despair, despondency and a collective death-wish.
Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Decolonising the Mind. (via sukoot)

(Source: daughterofzami)

The first architectural gesture is acted upon the earth: it is our grave or our foundation. A plane against a surface of variable curvature, the first frame is an excavation. But perhaps this is just the bedrock of western thought. Unlike our western architecture whose first frame confronts the earth, Japanese architecture raises its screens to the wind, the light, and the rain. Partitions and parasols rather than excavations: screens emphasize the void.
—Deleuze and Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus.  (via groansofcreation)
Modernism and postmodernism are not chronological eras, but political positions in the century-long struggle between art and technology. If modernism expresses utopian longing by anticipating the reconciliation of social function and aesthetic form, postmodernism acknowledges their nonidentity and keeps fantasy alive. Each position thus represents a partial truth; each will recur ‘anew’, so long as the contradictions of commodity society are not overcome.
—Susan Buck-Morss, The Dialectics of Seeing. (via bustakay)
What strikes me is the fact that in our society, art has become something which is related only to objects and not to individuals, or to life. That art is something which is specialized or which is done by experts who are artists. But couldn’t everyone’s life become a work of art? Why should the lamp or the house be an art object, but not our life?
—Michel Foucalt (via nyctaeus)

(Source: zuzora)