vandlo:

M.I.A. writing her album “Arular” - 2004 

vandlo:

M.I.A. writing her album “Arular” - 2004 

vuls:

Dame Barbara Hepworth, Tides I 1946

vuls:

Dame Barbara Hepworth, Tides I 1946

explore-blog:

Fantastic New Yorker profile of Brian Eno. Also see his Oblique Strategies, Eno’s creativity prompts from the 1970s, mentioned in the first paragraph of the piece. 
It’s interesting to consider the parallels with science, where not-knowing is also the building block of “composition,” or progress.

explore-blog:

Fantastic New Yorker profile of Brian Eno. Also see his Oblique Strategies, Eno’s creativity prompts from the 1970s, mentioned in the first paragraph of the piece. 

It’s interesting to consider the parallels with science, where not-knowing is also the building block of “composition,” or progress.

1109-83:

Megumi Satsu and Jean Baudrillard

"Satsu was a close friend of Jean Baudrilliard. Later the famed sociologist would write two songs for her, ‘Motel Suicide’ and ‘Lifting Zodiacal’."

1109-83:

Megumi Satsu and Jean Baudrillard

"Satsu was a close friend of Jean Baudrilliard. Later the famed sociologist would write two songs for her, ‘Motel Suicide’ and ‘Lifting Zodiacal’."

androphilia:

The band Massive Attack delivers solidarity message for Gaza. (via Khaled Bey)

androphilia:

The band Massive Attack delivers solidarity message for Gaza. (via Khaled Bey)

“To think is not to get out of the cave; it is not to replace the uncertainty of shadows by the clear-cut outlines of things themselves, the flame’s flickering glow by the light of the true sun. To think is to enter the Labyrinth; more exactly, it is to make be and appear a Labyrinth when we might have stayed “lying among the flowers, facing the sky.” It is to lose oneself amidst galleries which exist only because we never tire of digging them; to turn round and round at the end of a cul-de-sac whose entrance has been shut off behind us—until, inexplicably, this spinning round opens up in the surrounding walls cracks which offer passage.”
Crossroads in the Labyrinth, Cornelius Castoriadis, 1978 (via outdarethenight)

likeafieldmouse:

Trevor Paglen - They Watch the Moon (2010)

"This photograph depicts a classified ‘listening station’ deep in the forests of West Virginia.

The station is located at the center of the National Radio Quiet Zone, a region of approximately 34,000 square kilometers in West Virginia and parts of Maryland.

Within the Quiet Zone, radio transmissions are severely restricted: omnidirectional and high-powered transmissions (such as wireless internet devices and FM radio stations) are not permitted.

The listening station, which forms part of the global ECHELON system, was designed in part to take advantage of a phenomenon called moonbounce.

Moonbounce involves capturing communications and telemetry signals from around the world as they escape into space, hit the moon, and are reflected back towards Earth.

The photograph is a long exposure under the full moon light.”

vuls:

Sir Anthony Caro 
Silver Piece 18 ‘Gazebo’ (1984), Silver, 18.5 x 31.5 x 26cm, B1725

vuls:

Sir Anthony Caro 

Silver Piece 18 ‘Gazebo’ (1984), Silver, 18.5 x 31.5 x 26cm, B1725

“There is only one valuable thing in art: the thing you cannot explain.”
Georges Braque (via amare-habeo)
themineralogist:

Cuprorivaite 1.0 close up (by someHerrings)
"An attempt at creating an ancient pigment made by the Egyptians called "Egyptian Blue" which was likely Cuprorivaite (CaCuSi4O10).
One part calcium oxide (lime) was combined with one part cupric oxide and four parts silica (ground glass). This was heated over an alcohol flame for a couple of hours. Where the mixture melted became a bright blue color once it cooled.”

themineralogist:

Cuprorivaite 1.0 close up (by someHerrings)

"An attempt at creating an ancient pigment made by the Egyptians called "Egyptian Blue" which was likely Cuprorivaite (CaCuSi4O10).

One part calcium oxide (lime) was combined with one part cupric oxide and four parts silica (ground glass). This was heated over an alcohol flame for a couple of hours. Where the mixture melted became a bright blue color once it cooled.”